Hupa¢asath First Nation

Preferred Name:
Hupa¢asath First Nation
Alternative Name:
Formerly Opetchesaht (Variation Opetchisaht)
Language:
Nuučaan̓uɫ
BC Regional Office:
West Coast (Nanaimo)
Region:
Vancouver Island & Coast
Reserve Land Area:219.10 ha
Chief:
Chief Steven Tatoosh
Council:
Councillor Jim Tatoosh,
Councillor Jolleen Dick,
Councillor Warren Lauder
Governance Structure:
Indian Act
Population (off First Nations land):198
Population (on First Nations land):132
Population Total:330
Address: P.O. Box 211
Port Alberni
V9Y 7M7
Economic Development Contact: Rick Hewson
CEO
rick@hupacasath.ca
Fax: (250) 724-1232
Phone: (250) 724-4041
Community Description
The Hupacasath First Nation is a First Nations government based in the Alberni Valley on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. The Hupacasath have, since time immemorial, managed their lands and resources sustainably. If they had not there would not have been as many fish and wildlife and as much forest and other resources at contact as there had been 8,000 years previously.
The concept of sustainable resource management upon which community life is built, is based on the following basic principles: Healthy People, Strong Culture, Healthy Environment, and Strong Governance System.
Treaty or Tribal Association
Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council
Summary of Economic Development Agreements, Community Businesses and Joint Ventures
When its Upnit Power Corporation (UPC) began generating power on China Creek in 2005, HFN became the first Aboriginal community in BC to be majority-owners (72.5%) and operators of a hydro project in BC. Today, the project is hailed as a model of Aboriginal resolve, environmental stewardship and an ability to create mutually beneficial partnerships with industry, municipal government, financial institutions and other First Nations.
Economic Development Background
The Hupacasath First Nation is a progressive and active community government that is always looking for new economic development and partnership opportunities in their vast traditional territory.